Using Stem Cutting And Rooting Hormone To Grow Your Plants

A good gardening tip is that you can make more plants from your existing house and garden plants.  This will cut out the expense of buying new house and garden plants. Look around for healthy plants to take the stem cuttings from to plant in a peat moss mixture using rooting hormone. This is what is called the mother plant. Make sure the mother plant has enough stems so the cutting will not kill the mother plant.

If you start your house and garden plants from stem cuttings instead of seeds it will take half the time to root.  There a just a few things you will need : a mother plant, a flat for potting with a peat moss mixture, a sharp knife or razor blade, rooting hormone, containers for holding water and rooting hormone, alcohol, pencil or a stick, and a plastic bag.

Common sense tells you that you should take a stem cutting from the plant’s thickest green non flowering stems.  The spot where the leaf attaches to the stem, known as the node, are the best place for you to take the stem cutting. The plants growth rooting hormones are concentrated there. Choose green, non-woody stems for taking the stem cuttings from the mother plant. Newer growth is easier to root than woody stems.

Cut with a sterilized instrument, either a very sharp knife or a razor blade, just below the node and then make another slanted cut about two or three inches further up the plant. This should provide you a stem cutting about three inches in length with two or three nodes.  Trim off the side shoots and remove most of the leaves leaving a few since the stem cutting will need the leaves to provide food.  Any large leaves must be removed as their wilting stresses the stem cutting and will definitely slow down the rooting process.

With your sterilized instrument make a clean cut in the bottom node.  The roots will be formed from the sliced node.

Fill a clean plant pot or container with a peat moss potting mix to hold your stem cuttings for rooting. By using a peat moss potting mix you are giving the plant an atmosphere where the cutting will stay moist, not wet and sloppy.

You can make your own peat moss mixture; here are a couple of recipes:

1/2 sand and 1/2 peat moss or
1/2 perlite and 1/2 peat moss or
1/2 sand and 1/2 vermiculite or
1/2 perlite and 1/2 vermiculite or
Equal parts sand, perlite, vermiculite or peat moss instead of vermiculite.

Start by dipping the bottom inch of the stem cutting into the water and then the rooting hormone. This will help to speed up the creation of roots. The rooting hormone stimulates the stem cutting to send out new roots from the node.  You will need to dip the cutting into the water and then into the rooting hormone. Tap off the excess as to not jeopardize your success with this stem cutting.  If, after you have finished with your stem cuttings you have some of the rooting hormone left, throw it away.  Once a stem cutting has touched it the rooting hormone becomes activated.

Moisten the peat moss potting mixture and poke holes in it to accommodate your plants. By making holes in the peat moss rooting medium with the pencil or the stick it will ensure that the rooting hormone remains on the cutting, not on the potting mixture surface. This will improve chances of rooting the stem cuttings and creating new house or garden plants. After you have successfully placed the stem cutting in the medium, gently press the potting mixture around it. You should plant your cuttings about 4-5 inches apart to allow for air circulation and room to root.

Place the container into a plastic bag and put it in a warm spot in the house.  The reason for the bag is to keep the stem cuttings in high humidity and to hold in heat. You are creating a mini Greenhouse that takes up very little space.  Don’t seal the bag as you need to allow for air circulation.  Only after you see new growth should the cuttings be placed in a sunny area.  Keep checking you stem cuttings.  If the bag shows condensation you are likely giving it too much moisture.  Take off the bag and let it dry out a little.  

The way to test for new root growth is to gently pull on the plant after a few weeks.  If there is resistance the plants are ready to be transferred into individual pots. Now you will have a new plant that you have cultivated from the mother plant.

Now use all these gardening tips and grow some new plants using stem cuttings.

Happy Gardening!

Grow Herbs for Cooking Companion Plants and Flowers

Herbs are such versatile plants. Their uses include medicinal, cosmetic, as essential oils for aromatherapy, as great companion plants, craft-work and of course to add mouth-watering flavours and aromas in our cooking.

I really wonder how some people get by without herbs in their garden. How wonderful is it wander outside and pick a variety of fresh herbs for your main meal?

If you haven’t grown herbs before, just start with some really easy to grow herbs that you find particularly useful. I have an organic garden, so everything is free from chemicals.

Most people would use parsley, oregano and thyme. These are very easy herbs to grow. Oregano and thyme may spread a little in your garden and if you let your parsley eventually go to seed you will find new plants (volunteers) pop up all over your garden by themselves. I love this natural process of self seeding.

My garden is a little on the wild side. But if you prefer a very neat and tidy garden, don’t let your herbs go to seed, or pull out any volunteers growing in an undesirable spot. You can either remove the old plant to make way for new plants or cut off the seed heads. I always let my parsley go to seed. Some seeds make it to the ground, producing volunteers, so I always have enough to cut for culinary uses. The rest of the seeds I dry and also use in cooking.

Borage will grow almost anywhere through the warmer months. It is a great companion plant to strawberries, tomatoes and squash. Plus it looks pretty in the garden with its purple / blue, star-shaped flowers. It will also readily self-seed. The chooks love it, so when I have too many seedlings pop up they go to the chooks.

Rosemary and lavender have multiple uses. Both can be used in craft. Both attract bees. Both can be grown as wonderful looking and smelling hedges.

Grow at least a few clumps of chives or garlic chives. They look amazing when grown in clumps – even as a border in your flower garden. Chives look stunning when they’re in flower. Chives have pink, round flowers, while garlic chives have white star-shaped flowers. Grow garlic chives for times when you don’t have any garlic, or you want a milder flavour.

A good tip is to make sure you keep all mints contained in some kind of pot. If it escapes into your garden it may take over! I love having mint available, so I grow it in an old laundry trough.

Lemon balm is another herb that can get out of control. Cutting off the seed heads will keep it in check.

A bay tree is a great addition to your garden. You can grow it in a pot if space is an issue – they look lovely clipped into a nice shape. Or you can grow it in the ground where it may grow to be a small to medium tree.

Once you’ve grown a few herbs and learn of their many uses I’m sure you’ll be hooked. The herbs in this article are all very easy to grow and propagate, so start with these and try others as your knowledge grows. With a little research you will discover so many uses for herbs, including many wonderful health benefits.

They are also excellent companion plants. Some have properties that confuse and deter pests, some attract predatory insects, while others give more vigour or flavour to plants grown near them.

Many herbs are also excellent activators for your compost heap. Most herbs are easy to grow, take very little time, space or effort and the rewards are delicious. Good luck growing yours.

Julie is an avid organic gardener and recycler, living on a small country property in South Australia. Her mission is to encourage as many people as possible to garden organically. Please visit her website for great info Beginners Organic Gardening or Companion Planting Guide
www.1stoporganicgardening.com

Grow Your Own Organic Food Now

More and more research is now revealing the health benefits of organic food. For example, children on organic diets have been shown to have significantly lower exposure to nerve poison pesticides. An organic diet provides immediate protection for children against harmful chemicals.

If this isn’t reason enough to start growing your own organic food – what is? When we consider that we can produce enough vegetables to sustain a family right from our own backyard at almost no cost and with very little effort there’s really no excuse for putting it off until tomorrow.

Organic growing guide

There’s no time like the present, so read this organic growing guide and get started NOW!

If you have an existing garden you can easily begin by improving your soil, buying a load of good quality commercial garden soil or starting a no dig garden. But before you do, work out the size of your garden bed.

If you start with a small area, let’s say 2m x 2m (6ft x 6ft approx) you’ll be able to grow enough leafy greens for two people. Adding another bed this size will allow you to grow enough to feed a family.

Before you start, check that you have met these requirements:

Your plants are positioned where they will get at least six hours of sunlight daily
You can get to your plants quickly and easily when it’s time to harvest
Your compost, tools, water supply and fertilizers are easily accessible

Another good option is to make a path along the middle of your bed so that you can reach any small weeds as they appear. A simple tug at the right time will save you a lot of weeding later if you let them take hold.

Square plots can be set up on lawn or if you prefer in a straight line along a fence. If you choose the fence position, make sure you take account of where the shade will fall. Plants deprived of sunlight will not produce the best crops.

If you have only limited space available try gardening in pots instead. There’s one big advantage when gardening in containers – you can move them around according to the weather. If your porch is too hot at certain times of the year, move your pots to where the sun is less punishing. If the harsh winter brings frosts, move your Brassicas to a more congenial spot.

5 steps to better soil

If you have soil, whatever its condition, consider yourself extremely lucky.

‘But it’s never produced anything! My soil’s completely dead.’

No problem. Your soil can be improved very quickly. Here’s how to do it:

Water the ground a day before you start.
Get rid of any weeds.
Cover the area with compost, manure, lawn clippings, and organic fertilizer and then dig this in.
Cover the whole lot with mulch to make sure it stays moist.
After a week or so scrape away the mulch, add more of the compost and manure and then put the mulch cover back.

You should then repeat this process until you have about 30cm (12 inches)of  rich and crumbly soil ready for planting.

If your soil is okay to start with, use the technique above to make it even richer. Begin by removing any weeds, then spread your organic material over the surface. Here’s where you need to do a little hard work – break up any clumps of soil and dig down about a spade depth. You can now plant your seedlings.

Gardening in a trench

If all of the above sounds too hard, or if your site is not suitable, try improving little pockets of soil with the ‘trench composting’ method. You simply need to dig a hole, or a longer trench, fill it with green waste material and let nature turn this small area into a usable piece of ground.

The Bokashi composting system works on just this principle. Bokashi is a product made using a combination of sawdust and bran that has been infused with Effective Micro-organisms (EM). Bokashi buckets can fit easily under the kitchen sink. Add the EM and watch your scraps quickly ferment.

Buying seedlings

Organic seedlings are not generally available from commercial suppliers, so try farmers’ markets, organic farms and local organic growing groups first. Seedlings are usually quite expensive so try growing from seed. This takes longer but is probably the most satisfying way to start your organic garden.

I’m committed to promoting organic gardening and home food production as a way of life. Visit my website to get more information on organic gardening, or get my free mini-course and learn more about simple solutions to growing your own organic food.

Why You Should Grow Your Own Vegetables

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With every passing day, an increasing number of people are starting their own vegetable gardens. Today about 38% of Americans already have their own vegetable gardens and this number will further grow since people are so health conscious. So if you are thinking about growing a vegetable garden, think no further because growing a vegetable garden has so many benefits. Below mentioned are some good reasons for growing a vegetable garden of your own.

 

Vegetable gardening can be a really profitable business. If you have a word with some of the people living in your locality you will know how much they hate paying for vegetables that are produced synthetically. You on the other hand can take this as a great opportunity to make money! All you have to do is start growing organic vegetables in your garden or backyard and sell them at a price that’s lower than market price. On the surface this might not seem like a big amount of money, but when you know what vegetable to grow and consistently grow it for the next 30 days, you should generate a good amount of extra income. You might want to have a look at cash crop!

 

If you aren’t interested in selling the vegetables in your local market, you can always have them for you and your family. This way you can save a good amount of money that you would spend on groceries. Vegetables that are grown in your garden will also be tastier and healthier in comparison to the vegetables available in the market.

 

Most times farmers overuse fertilizers and pesticides which deteriorates the quality of the vegetables. This not only takes away the nutritional values of the vegetable, it also takes away the taste, which is why people hate eating vegetables. So if you are thinking of preparing a really tasty dish for your family, give vegetable gardening a shot and you family will love you even more!

 

Many people take up vegetable gardening just for the fact that it reduces stress. When you will breathe all the oxygen produced by your vegetable garden, you will find yourself a lot more relaxed than you usually are. You can also start growing a vegetable garden if you are amongst those people who would like to lose weight.

 

Planting vegetables can actually be a great hobby. You will have a lot of fun growing a vegetable garden, especially when you want to keep busy and do something constructive with your time. Believe it or not, people actually become happy by seeing their plants grow. So are you ready to start a vegetable garden?

All the information you need in order to create a simple yet very effective garden can be found at Growing a Vegetable Garden !!

How to grow your own little organic vegetable garden

There is nothing more gratifying than to coax food from earth. The rhythms and time of nature becomes the utmost template by which to live. If you have been planning to grow an organic garden on my own and now, it’s time to get up and make it happen. Growing your own organic garden is not only good for your health; it can be your favorite winding down activity. Firstly, you won’t need to go to the market to buy vegetables. Secondly, you can reduce your carbon footprints and enjoy fresh and tasty vegetables of your own garden.

Growing an organic garden is not as complicated as it seems. Access to a roof, a deck, a patch of ground is enough to produce the vegetables needed for your dinner table. If you don’t have garden then you can also start gardening having edible plants in the house e.g. herbs and other such type of things. Here are some simple steps to grow organic garden:

Stop applying weed killers and pesticides to the soil of your garden. Organic garden helps to grow vegetables and fruits in your garden without any use of toxic chemicals.
Start from a small patch. You need to find an ideal spot for gardening that has sun all year. Try to avoid the area next to the fences or buildings because of contamination of the soil by heavy metals, paint and chemicals.
Start maintaining the patch you have selected. Clear the patch with any kind of debris and rocks larger than a finger nail.
Cover your gardening area with organic material. You can use dried grass, leaves and plant material from pesticide sprayed garden.
Get a bucketful of compost and soil from under forest trees. Carefully spread this in thin layers all over the patch selected for gardening. Use a shovel or pick in order to mix the organic material and soil.
Try to keep your soil damp instead of soggy. Don’t walk on soil. You can make a kneeling board to avoid the soil to compact or you can also use an old cushion in order to save your knees.
Obtain vegetables in four square pots of a common size. You need to dig a hole of larger than a root ball size. In order to unstick the plant, squeeze the sides of the pot. Fluff plant’s roots sideways and then plant it. Further, you need to mulch it with organic material in order to keep the soil moist. Water the root ball of a plant properly.
Heap up all the fine organic material on your own. You need to apply the compost to the soil periodically around your plants.
Harvest your vegetables and think of a delicious recipe. Get ready to enjoy the wonderful dinner with your friends and family!

You can learn also learn to grow an organic garden through Internet, books and probably, your local farmer! Whichever path you take, I wish you the best joy. Just never forget that it takes patience and time to grow a great garden.

Whichever path you take to build a greener home, I wish you the best joy you can ever have. Visit Springday for more environmental tips. They also provide various goal setting tools and fitness  training programs, to inspire you to achieve your weight loss, health and  wellness goals.

Grow Cucumbers For Your Garden

There are many kinds of cucumbers: picklers, slicers, gherkins and bush cucumbers. You can pickle any small size cucumbers. To learn how to pickle cucumbers, do a Google Search to discover how. Slicers have large cylinder-shaped fruit that are great for slicing and serving fresh. You can eat raw cucumbers fresh off the vine after washing them or you can slice them and add them to salads. There or so many ways to use cucumbers. That is the reason for their popularity.

The size at which you pick your cucumbers depends on the variety. Slicers are best when they are 6″-8″ long. Picklers are best when harvested when they are 3″-5″.

Sow your cucumbers in a sunny area in your garden in well drained soil. Cucumbers like warm and humid weather. They also generally need fifty to sixty days to grow and produce. Add an organic fertilizer like 5-5-10 to the soil before sowing. Add more fertilizer right after the blossoms form then again three weeks later. Mulch the soil with hay straw when the weather gets very warm. This helps preserve moisture around the plants. Water the base of the plants deeply and regularly in the early morning or late evening. Do not water so much as to create a muddy mess. Avoid getting leaves wet since wet leaves are susceptible to disease.

Cucumber plants produce long vines that require lots of space. It is a good idea to place a trellis for your vines to climb during development. This way they are off the ground, precluding the introduction of soil borne disease and insects.

Cucumbers require lots of nitrogen. If your leaves turn yellow this is an indication of a shortage of nitrogen. Once the plants start to grow, it is a good idea to add compost around the plants for more nutrients as cucumbers need a lot of food.

Cucumbers are ready to harvest in 50 to 70 days. Use a pair of scissors to cut the cucumbers from the vine. This avoids damaging the plant and makes for ease of harvesting. If your cucumbers are stressed while developing, they can become bitter. This can be avoided by watering the plants regularly. If your crop is bitter you can cut off one to two inches of the cucumber tips. The bitterness is usually concentrated in the tips while the rest of the cucumber can be perfect.

Cucumbers are easy and fun to grow. Their crisp, juicy fruit adds crunch to salads and can be eaten raw for a refreshing treat. With care, your cucumber harvest can be a nutritious addition to your family diet.

Robert Gregory Donaldson is a writer and gardener living in Reno, Nevada where he grows a variety of food crops. His blog is: http://growing-a-garden.blogspot.com/

Grow Your Own Organic Vegetable Garden

Everyone knows that eating vegetables is good for you, helps you lose weight, improve your health and so on, ESPECIALLY when they’re organic. Yet as much as we love our organic vegetables, buying them can get costly due to production and distribution costs.

 

Here’s a crazy idea – why not grow your OWN garden? You can save money on groceries, get some exercise while you garden and enjoy super fresh food. Eating delicious, organic vegetables means you decrease the amount of pesticides you consume and the amount of food you waste. Plus, you help protect the environment from harmful toxins and chemicals in its soil. AND now there’s absolutely NO excuse to keep you from getting your daily amount of veggies!

Now is actually the perfect time to start growing your own vegetables. Here’s how:

1. Planning is key. Think about what you eat and what you want to grow. There’s no point in growing green beans if you hate ‘em! Plus, you need to think about how much time you’re willing to spend. If you love gardening, you’ll probably still be excited about this project in August. If you’re more of a “great indoors” person, consider starting out small with herbs and plants you keep by a kitchen windowsill.

2. Determine space. Apartment living is great, but you don’t have much space. Try a container garden or look into square-foot gardening. If you have a proper yard, figure out WHERE you want to plant your vegetables.

3. Think small. The inexperienced gardener might want to start growing CROPS, not food for your kitchen table. Start off easy and gradually expand to more vegetables every season.

4. Buy low, sell high. Consider the cost ratio of each plant. If it’s going to cost $10 to grow tomatoes, for example, but you really only eat maybe $5 in a summer, you’re losing money. On the other hand, if you love tomatoes, growing them will save you money in the long run since they often cost more at the grocery store.

5. Sharing is caring. Consider sharing seed packets with family, friends and neighbors. This goes for a healthy harvest, too – if you’ve overrun with chili peppers, share your bounty with others as gifts.

6. Compost. If you’ve got a little extra room, making a compost pile is an excellent way to feed your plants and keep your food waste out of landfills, where it will take MUCH longer to decompose.

Gardening is a great way to relax and have fun. Don’t turn it into a chore – your garden doesn’t need to be picture perfect, so long as you can reap what you sow. Just choose your favorite vegetables, fruits and herbs, and start planting! Get the whole family involved or use it to spend some quality “me” time. No matter how you garden, you’ll be growing fresh, inexpensive and ORGANIC food you and your family can enjoy eating.

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*Featured article from the Organic Liaison Blog

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ABOUT ORGANIC LIAISON

Kirstie Alley’s Organic Liaison is a brand new, innovative weight loss program with the goal of “liaising” people from conventional eating habits to healthier organic ones while losing weight and supporting the body 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Organic Liaison membership offers a complete system including Rescue Me ™ weight loss elixir, the first USDA certified organic weight loss product; access to online tools including a daily journal, weight loss graph, daily menu planner; as well as other natural supplements and health tips to help members lose weight safely and effectively. Organic Liaison worked with experts in the fields of organics, nutrition and fitness to create an outstanding natural weight loss lifestyle and a comprehensive health and fitness community for their members.

 

*Find Organic Liaison on Facebook.

*Follow Kirstie Alley on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Grow Your Own Organic Vegetable Garden

Everyone knows that eating vegetables is good for you, helps you lose weight, improve your health and so on, ESPECIALLY when they’re organic. Yet as much as we love our organic vegetables, buying them can get costly due to production and distribution costs.

Here’s a crazy idea – why not grow your OWN garden? You can save money on groceries, get some exercise while you garden and enjoy super fresh food. Eating delicious, organic vegetables means you decrease the amount of pesticides you consume and the amount of food you waste. Plus, you help protect the environment from harmful toxins and chemicals in its soil. AND now there’s absolutely NO excuse to keep you from getting your daily amount of veggies!

Now is actually the perfect time to start growing your own vegetables. Here’s how:

1. Planning is key. Think about what you eat and what you want to grow. There’s no point in growing green beans if you hate ‘em! Plus, you need to think about how much time you’re willing to spend. If you love gardening, you’ll probably still be excited about this project in August. If you’re more of a “great indoors” person, consider starting out small with herbs and plants you keep by a kitchen windowsill.

2. Determine space. Apartment living is great, but you don’t have much space. Try a container garden or look into square-foot gardening. If you have a proper yard, figure out WHERE you want to plant your vegetables.

3. Think small. The inexperienced gardener might want to start growing CROPS, not food for your kitchen table. Start off easy and gradually expand to more vegetables every season.

4. Buy low, sell high. Consider the cost ratio of each plant. If it’s going to cost $10 to grow tomatoes, for example, but you really only eat maybe $5 in a summer, you’re losing money. On the other hand, if you love tomatoes, growing them will save you money in the long run since they often cost more at the grocery store.

5. Sharing is caring. Consider sharing seed packets with family, friends and neighbors. This goes for a healthy harvest, too – if you’ve overrun with chili peppers, share your bounty with others as gifts.

6. Compost. If you’ve got a little extra room, making a compost pile is an excellent way to feed your plants and keep your food waste out of landfills, where it will take MUCH longer to decompose.

Gardening is a great way to relax and have fun. Don’t turn it into a chore – your garden doesn’t need to be picture perfect, so long as you can reap what you sow. Just choose your favorite vegetables, fruits and herbs, and start planting! Get the whole family involved or use it to spend some quality “me” time. No matter how you garden, you’ll be growing fresh, inexpensive and ORGANIC food you and your family can enjoy eating.

______

*Featured article from the Organic Liaison Blog

______

ABOUT ORGANIC LIAISON

Kirstie Alley’s Organic Liaison is a brand new, innovative weight loss program with the goal of “liaising” people from conventional eating habits to healthier organic ones while losing weight and supporting the body 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Organic Liaison membership offers a complete system including Rescue Me ™ weight loss elixir, the first USDA certified organic weight loss product; access to online tools including a daily journal, weight loss graph, daily menu planner; as well as other natural supplements and health tips to help members lose weight safely and effectively. Organic Liaison worked with experts in the fields of organics, nutrition and fitness to create an outstanding natural weight loss lifestyle and a comprehensive health and fitness community for their members.

 

*Find Organic Liaison on Facebook.

*Follow Kirstie Alley on Facebook and Twitter.

 

HOW TO GROW CUCUMBERS THE EASY WAY GARDEN START

WHAT KIND SHOULD I PLANT?
I love to grow cucumbers, there are so many shapes and sizes to
choose from.. Let’s explore the different types. There are hybrid
cucumber seeds (seeds that are cross bred to enhance a feature)
and there are non-hybrid seeds (the kind grandma use to grow every
year and save the seed from). I use non-hybrid in my garden so I
can save my own seeds. In the south and places of high humidity,
the hybrids are more necessary because they have been bred to
resist certain diseases that come along with the heat and humidity.
Ask a neighbor gardener which seeds he likes best, this will give you
a clue as to which seeds will work best in your area. Any seed that is
a hybrid should have the word hybrid on the label. If it is not labeled
it should be a non-hybrid.

 

Burpless

These cucumbers have less “burp” in them. They are
milder on your stomach, if you have trouble eating regular cucumbers
because they make you burp then the burpless are for you.

 

Armenian (65 days)

Armenian is the mildest of all cucumbers. It is
actually in the squash family, but taste like a cucumber. These
cucumbers can get up to 3 feet long. They are light green and
ribbed. Harvest can start when the cucumber is 10 inches long.
They like really warm weather and will not do anything until the
weather warms up. They like to grow on a trellis. These are great
cucumbers and once you try them, you will want to grow them every
year. This cucumber is a non-hybrid and you can save the seeds to
grow a new crop.

 

Muncher (65 days)

This is a great burpless cucumber. It is a heavy
producer. Pick the cucumbers small for the best flavor. Our family
grows a lot of these burpless cucumbers. This is also a non-hybrid
and you can save the seeds off of it to grow a new crop.
Other burpless cucumbers that are hybrid but are not reliable for
seed saving are: Tasty Green Hybrid, Tasty King Hybrid, Sweet Slice
Hybrid, Burpless Orient Express.

Ten Tips to Grow Flavorful Herbs Indoors

Growing plant indoors, herbs in particular, has become a trend among gardeners, and even among plain homeowners. Herbs are not only the easiest varieties of plants to grow, but most of them are very well adapted to an indoor environment. They also have different properties that make them suitable for various uses and purposes. Hence having them inside the house is truly beneficial.

Herbs can serve medicinal, ornamental and therapeutical applications. But they are probably best known for their culinary uses. The right herbs add distinct flavors to any dish and makes it taste fuller and more sumptuous. Professional chefs and ordinary house cooks know what wonders freshly picked herbs can do to their cooking. And given the choice, they would grow herbs inside their kitchen where they can easily help themselves to a handful of fresh, flavorful herbs.

And the good thing is, growing herbs indoors is not hard at all. In fact, you might find the activity enjoyable. Bring out the best and most intense flavors of your herbs with these ten tips:

One: Herbs need excellent drainage. Mix two parts of standard potting soil and one part of perlite for a good soil mixture that drains properly.

Two: Make sure that the pots or containers have enough drainage holes. You can add an inch of small gravel at the bottom of the pot to ensure good drainage.

Three: Better herb nutrition, better herb flavor. It’s better if you can start potting the herbs with an organic and nutrient-rich soil. Compost is wonderful addition to the potting mixture.

Four: Because of the limited supply of nutrients, potted herbs require more feeding than herbs grown in the garden. Organic liquid fertilizers and fish emulsion, applied once every week or every two weeks will give your herbs more intense flavors.

Five: Use only organic fertilizers for your herbs because chemical based products affect their taste.

Six: Most culinary herbs require full sun exposure. Place them near windows and other areas in the house that receive more sunlight, or better yet, grow a windowsill herb garden.

Seven: Water only when the soil feels dry to the touch. Water up to the brim of the pot but make sure that water drains quickly. Otherwise, check if the drainage holes are clogged.

Eight: Herbs do not stand extreme changes in temperature. Do not place them near appliances that generate heat like the stove and refrigerator, and appliances that produce cold drafts like air conditioners.

Nine: Herbs thrive best in a balanced humidity. If the air inside is too dry, place a bowl of water near your herbs to improve moisture in the air.

Ten: Occasional pruning and trimming will encourage your herbs to grow more bushy. Some herbs, like mint, are more aggressive and pruning is required to keep them from growing out of hand.

Nova Person is an herb enthusiast and has been growing herbs indoors for a long time. She developed her expertise on growing almost any kind of herbs from over 20 years of experience in herb gardening and now shares this knowledge on her own site. On her site, you’ll find that indoors, herbs are as easy to grow as they are outdoors. To know more about her secrets in successful indoor herb gardening, please visit http://www.GrowHerbsInfo.com

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